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21 December 2013 @ 12:40pm

inhalers:

being addicted to american tv shows is so annoying because you guys have so many stupid fucking holidays for everything that every other week im disappointed when I go to see if the next ep is up yet and its like nOPE it’s fucking ‘armadillo day’ or something in the states ffs

16 December 2013 @ 12:07pm
11 December 2013 @ 9:43pm

peble:

did i actually save or did i imagine it? better save eleven more times

via  samanthakaynielsen  (originally  peble)
4 December 2013 @ 4:05pm

julvett:

catching fire was really good

i’m so glad they stayed so close to the book

now i hope they change mockingjay completely

27 November 2013 @ 10:18pm
A man who assisted in autopsies in a big urban hospital, starting in the mid-1950s, describes the many deaths from botched abortions that he saw. “The deaths stopped overnight in 1973.” He never saw another in the 18 years before he retired. “That,” he says, “ought to tell people something about keeping abortion legal.”
~ “The Way It Was” — Mother Jones Magazine — Abortion before Roe v. Wade.  (via edcunningham)
via  neil-gaiman  (originally  gotthatglitteronmyeyes)
19 November 2013 @ 2:16pm

brobecks:

If you command me to do something that I was already planning on doing the chances of me doing that thing automatically drop to zero

via  zoeyydeutchh  (originally  brobecks)
11 October 2013 @ 3:50pm
tagged   this  
via  nicolasrefn  (originally  nicolasrefn)
9 October 2013 @ 7:55pm
That’s one of the great things about music. You can sing a song to 85,000 people and they’ll sing it back for 85,000 different reasons.
~ Dave Grohl  (via housewifeswag)
via  zoeyydeutchh  (originally  radioehead)
8 September 2013 @ 8:37pm
Biology’s cruel joke goes something like this: As a teenage body goes through puberty, its circadian rhythm essentially shifts three hours backward. Suddenly, going to bed at nine or ten o’clock at night isn’t just a drag, but close to a biological impossibility. Studies of teenagers around the globe have found that adolescent brains do not start releasing melatonin until around eleven o’clock at night and keep pumping out the hormone well past sunrise. Adults, meanwhile, have little-to-no melatonin in their bodies when they wake up. With all that melatonin surging through their bloodstream, teenagers who are forced to be awake before eight in the morning are often barely alert and want nothing more than to give in to their body’s demands and fall back asleep. Because of the shift in their circadian rhythm, asking a teenager to perform well in a classroom during the early morning is like asking him or her to fly across the country and instantly adjust to the new time zone — and then do the same thing every night, for four years.
17 August 2013 @ 9:41pm
via  marcelovieira  (originally  adulthoodcanwait)